Milk Soaked Steel Cut Oats

A guest post by Heather Sullivan
Gluten free/Nut Fee/Dairy free if you use Heather’s suggestion to use flax milk.

I wanted to share this super simple and highly nutritious recipe for steel cut oats that we’ve been devouring lately.  I like cold cereal with milk in the summer – especially when pressed with time like when I have a hungry toddler on my hands at 5:30 am.  The problem with cold cereal is that it’s hard to find a good and affordable wheat-free, low sugar,
protein-rich option that’s enjoyable for both me and the little guy.  So when I tried milk-soaked steel cut oats, I was hooked.

 

Here’s the simple recipe:

Soak steel cut oats in milk (I use flax milk) in a 1:2 plus a little milk ratio.  I usually do 1.25 cups raw steel cut oats with 3 cups of milk and soak overnight.  It will last in the fridge for 3 mornings and soften just a little but still maintain a nice consistency-  not too soggy.

Then I add the following toppings to each 1/4 cup of soaked oats:
1/4 cup flax milk (you can use the milk the oats soaked in and add a little fresh milk)
1/2 oz pecans
1/2 oz raisins
1 tsp real maple syrup
1 Tbsp pumpkin seeds
a dash of salt
cinnamon to taste

Or try any toppings you like.

Nutrition information for my concoction:
349 calories
16 g fat
46 g carbohydrates
7 g fiber
9 g protein

So why do I use steel cut oats as opposed to any other type of oat or other grain?

  • Steel cut oats aren’t processed meaning all the nutrients they naturally contain are intact.
  • These nutrients include healthy fats, fiber and protein as well as iron, B vitamins and magnesium.
  • The fiber, protein and low sugar content of this recipe makes it low glycemic meaning it’s a good choice for anyone trying to control their weight and/or blood sugar.
  •  In this recipe, the steel cut oats alone are a good source of iron (10% of the RDI) and with the added nuts and seeds they provide 23%.  A great choice for anyone, young or old who needs more iron in her diet.
  • Additionally, the steel cut oats provide 22% of the RDI for magnesium (36% with the added toppings…the pumpkin seeds are a great source).  Magnesium is a nutrient so many of us don’t get enough of.  It helps regulate insulin and blood sugar levels, strengthen bones, control cholesterol and regulate heartbeat.  Magnesium may also be helpful during pregnancy by reducing risk of preeclampsia, premature contractions and leg cramps.  Magnesium deficiency may also be associated with migraines.
  • Finally, I love the taste and consistency of soaked steel cut oats!

Love Heather’s recipes?  Read more Green and Plenty recipes on Healthy Kids Ideas Exchange, or experience her full blog on bloggerspot, which includes “green” tips for a healthy household.

 

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